1-mies-rem-1200x789.jpg
Door detail, Lemke House, Berlin (1933)
Door detail, Lemke House, Berlin (1933)
Living Room Column and Curtain Detail, Tugendhat House, Brno
Living Room Column and Curtain Detail, Tugendhat House, Brno
Detail, Lemke House
Detail, Lemke House
Federal Center, Chicago (1964)
Federal Center, Chicago (1964)

Finding something new to photograph in Mies' work can seem a challenge, because all four sides are usually alike, and to the casual observer, most of his buildings appear as perfect copies of each other. But there is beauty and serenity to be discovered in the rhythm of regularity and conformity.

Crown Hall, Chicago (1956)
Crown Hall, Chicago (1956)
Federal Center, Chicago
Federal Center, Chicago
 At Mies' iconic Farnsworth House outside Chicago, the details in which the Almighty resides are everywhere. They've been captured in photographs countless times. What else is there to find?

At Mies' iconic Farnsworth House outside Chicago, the details in which the Almighty resides are everywhere. They've been captured in photographs countless times. What else is there to find?

9-farnsworth-kitchen-796x1200.jpg
10-barcelona-daybed1-844x1200.jpg
11-leavesgrid-1200x896.jpg
12-umbrellas-896x1200.jpg
 Some of his buildings at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, where Mies was Dean of Architecture, are showing their age. But there is something striking about the imperfection of perfection.

Some of his buildings at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, where Mies was Dean of Architecture, are showing their age. But there is something striking about the imperfection of perfection.

 Through the orange-colored glass of Koolhaas, Mies' rigid old buildings soften, gaining back some of their youthfulness.

Through the orange-colored glass of Koolhaas, Mies' rigid old buildings soften, gaining back some of their youthfulness.

 Mies' final building in his lifetime was the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, opened in 1968, a year before his death. A temple for art, and one might say a monument for its architect, its massive 1250-ton roof gazes intently at an elder, more ornate, devoutly religious neighbor.

Mies' final building in his lifetime was the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, opened in 1968, a year before his death. A temple for art, and one might say a monument for its architect, its massive 1250-ton roof gazes intently at an elder, more ornate, devoutly religious neighbor.

 The building's unrelenting glass pattern interacts with surrounding sculpture on the huge plaza inspired by Karl Friedrich Schinkel.

The building's unrelenting glass pattern interacts with surrounding sculpture on the huge plaza inspired by Karl Friedrich Schinkel.

 Even the most powerful of Mies' details, the lofty column, can occasionally be brought down to Earth.

Even the most powerful of Mies' details, the lofty column, can occasionally be brought down to Earth.

 But it is Mies' Chicago work I like best, particularly his Federal Center, where the usually taciturn architect engages in a spirited dialogue with Alexander Calder.

But it is Mies' Chicago work I like best, particularly his Federal Center, where the usually taciturn architect engages in a spirited dialogue with Alexander Calder.

19-calderarc2-1989-900x1200.jpg
20-miescalder-1200x822.jpg
 At his last building in North America, the IBM (1973), Mies converses with his student from the Bauhaus, architect Bertrand Goldberg, who according to architecture lore, has the last word: "Mies," Goldberg reportedly once told him, "I just can't do rectangles anymore."

At his last building in North America, the IBM (1973), Mies converses with his student from the Bauhaus, architect Bertrand Goldberg, who according to architecture lore, has the last word: "Mies," Goldberg reportedly once told him, "I just can't do rectangles anymore."

22-bertrandmies-1200x833.jpg
1-mies-rem-1200x789.jpg
Door detail, Lemke House, Berlin (1933)
Living Room Column and Curtain Detail, Tugendhat House, Brno
Detail, Lemke House
Federal Center, Chicago (1964)
Crown Hall, Chicago (1956)
Federal Center, Chicago
 At Mies' iconic Farnsworth House outside Chicago, the details in which the Almighty resides are everywhere. They've been captured in photographs countless times. What else is there to find?
9-farnsworth-kitchen-796x1200.jpg
10-barcelona-daybed1-844x1200.jpg
11-leavesgrid-1200x896.jpg
12-umbrellas-896x1200.jpg
 Some of his buildings at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, where Mies was Dean of Architecture, are showing their age. But there is something striking about the imperfection of perfection.
 Through the orange-colored glass of Koolhaas, Mies' rigid old buildings soften, gaining back some of their youthfulness.
 Mies' final building in his lifetime was the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, opened in 1968, a year before his death. A temple for art, and one might say a monument for its architect, its massive 1250-ton roof gazes intently at an elder, more ornate, devoutly religious neighbor.
 The building's unrelenting glass pattern interacts with surrounding sculpture on the huge plaza inspired by Karl Friedrich Schinkel.
 Even the most powerful of Mies' details, the lofty column, can occasionally be brought down to Earth.
 But it is Mies' Chicago work I like best, particularly his Federal Center, where the usually taciturn architect engages in a spirited dialogue with Alexander Calder.
19-calderarc2-1989-900x1200.jpg
20-miescalder-1200x822.jpg
 At his last building in North America, the IBM (1973), Mies converses with his student from the Bauhaus, architect Bertrand Goldberg, who according to architecture lore, has the last word: "Mies," Goldberg reportedly once told him, "I just can't do rectangles anymore."
22-bertrandmies-1200x833.jpg
Door detail, Lemke House, Berlin (1933)
Living Room Column and Curtain Detail, Tugendhat House, Brno
Detail, Lemke House
Federal Center, Chicago (1964)

Finding something new to photograph in Mies' work can seem a challenge, because all four sides are usually alike, and to the casual observer, most of his buildings appear as perfect copies of each other. But there is beauty and serenity to be discovered in the rhythm of regularity and conformity.

Crown Hall, Chicago (1956)
Federal Center, Chicago

At Mies' iconic Farnsworth House outside Chicago, the details in which the Almighty resides are everywhere. They've been captured in photographs countless times. What else is there to find?

Some of his buildings at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, where Mies was Dean of Architecture, are showing their age. But there is something striking about the imperfection of perfection.

Through the orange-colored glass of Koolhaas, Mies' rigid old buildings soften, gaining back some of their youthfulness.

Mies' final building in his lifetime was the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, opened in 1968, a year before his death. A temple for art, and one might say a monument for its architect, its massive 1250-ton roof gazes intently at an elder, more ornate, devoutly religious neighbor.

The building's unrelenting glass pattern interacts with surrounding sculpture on the huge plaza inspired by Karl Friedrich Schinkel.

Even the most powerful of Mies' details, the lofty column, can occasionally be brought down to Earth.

But it is Mies' Chicago work I like best, particularly his Federal Center, where the usually taciturn architect engages in a spirited dialogue with Alexander Calder.

At his last building in North America, the IBM (1973), Mies converses with his student from the Bauhaus, architect Bertrand Goldberg, who according to architecture lore, has the last word: "Mies," Goldberg reportedly once told him, "I just can't do rectangles anymore."

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